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Why You Should Block Notifications and Close Your Browser

Every so often, while browsing the web, you run into a web page that asks if you would like to allow the site to push notifications to your browser. Apparently, according to the paper under review, about 12% of the people who receive this notification allow notifications. What, precisely, is this doing, and what are the side effects?

Papadopoulos, Panagiotis, Panagiotis Ilia, Michalis Polychronakis, Evangelos P. Markatos, Sotiris Ioannidis, and Giorgos Vasiliadis. “Master of Web Puppets: Abusing Web Browsers for Persistent and Stealthy Computation.” In Proceedings 2019 Network and Distributed System Security Symposium. San Diego, CA: Internet Society, 2019. https://doi.org/10.14722/ndss.2019.23070.

Allowing notifications allows the server to kick off one of two different kinds of processes on the local computer, a service worker. There are, in fact, two kinds of worker apps that can run “behind” a web site in HTML5; the web worker and the service worker. The web worker is designed to calculate or locally render some object that will appear on the site, such as unencrypting a downloaded audio file for local rendition. This moves the processing load (including the power and cooling use!) from the server to the client, saving money for the hosting provider, and (potentially) rendering the object in question more quickly.

A service worker, on the other hand, is designed to support notifications. For instance, say you keep a news web site open all day in your browser. You do not necessarily want to reload the page ever few minutes; instead, you would rather the site send you a notification through the browser when some new story has been posted. Since the service worker is designed to cause an action in the browser on receiving a notification from the server, it has direct access to the network side of the host, and it can run even when the tab showing the web site is not visible.

In fact, because service workers are sometimes used to coordinate the information on multiple tabs, a service worker can both communicate between tabs within the same browser and stay running in the browser’s context even though the tab that started the service worker is closed. To make certain other tabs do not block while the server worker is running, they are run in a separate thread; they can consume resources from a different core in your processor, so you are not aware (from a performance perspective) they are running. To sweeten the pot, a service worker can be restarted after your browser has restarted by a special push notification from the server.

If a service worker sounds like a perfect setup for running code that can mine bitcoins or launch DDoS attacks from your web browser, then you might have a future in computer security. This is, in fact, what MarioNet, a proof-of-concept system described in this paper, does—it uses a service worker to consume resources off as many hosts as it can install itself on to do just about anything, including launching a DDoS attack.

Given the above, it should be simple enough to understand how the attack works. When the user lands on a web page, ask for permission to push notifications. A lot of web sites that do not seem to need such permission ask now, particularly ecommerce sites, so the question does not seem out of place almost anywhere any longer. Install a service worker, using the worker’s direct connection to the host’s network to communicate to a controller. The controller can then install code to be run into the service worker and direct the execution of that code. If the user closes their browser, randomly push notifications back to the browser, in case the user opens it again, thus recreating the service worker.

Since the service worker runs in a separate thread, the user will not notice any impact on web browsing performance from the use of their resources—in fact, MarioNet’s designers use fine-grained tracking of resources to ensure they do not consume enough to be noticed. Since the service worker runs between the browser and the host operating system, no defenses built into the browser can detect the network traffic to raise a flag. Since the service worker is running in the context of the browser, most anti-virus software packages will give the traffic and processing a pass.

Lessons learned?

First, making something powerful from a compute perspective will always open holes like this. There will never be any sort of system that both allows the transfer of computation from one system to another that will not have some hole which can be exploited.

Second, abstraction hides complexity, even the complexity of an attack or security breach, nicely. Abstraction is like anything else in engineering: if you haven’t found the tradeoffs, you haven’t looked hard enough.

Third, close your browser when you are done. The browser is, in many ways, an open door to the outside world through which all sorts of people can make it into your computer. I have often wanted to create a VM or container in which I can run a browser from a server on the ‘net. When I’m done browsing, I can shut the entire thing down and restore the state to “clean.” No cookies, no java stuff, no nothing. A nice fresh install each time I browse the web. I’ve never gotten around to building this, but I should really put it on my list of things to do.

Fourth, don’t accept inbound connection requests without really understanding what you are doing. A notification push is, after all, just another inbound connection request. It’s like putting a hole in your firewall for that one FTP server that you can’t control. Only it’s probably worse.

3 Comments

  1. Ethan Banks on 16 April 2019 at 12:15 pm

    RE: Lesson 3. FWIW, Qubes-OS is built around this approach, and offers even more security options leveraging Tor and proxies (if you so choose) per VM you build to run a browser in. I have not used Qubes personally, but watched a lengthy presentation that was mostly a long demo. Interesting approach.



  2. Russ on 16 April 2019 at 7:33 pm

    Thanks Ethan! I have thought about just running a vm, and a browser in that vm, on my local machine — I might play with that some.



  3. Jon on 22 April 2019 at 10:26 pm

    Check out Cookie Auto Delete for Firefox. Coupled with some other Firefox settings and you can have a mostly clean browser for every tab you open. Or even cleaner when you restart Firefox and don’t use tabs.



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