The Hedge Podcast Episode 27: New directions in network and computing systems

On this episode of the Hedge, Micah Beck joins us to discuss a paper he wrote recently considering a new model of compute, storage, and networking. Micah Beck is Associate Professor in computer science at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, where he researches and publishes in the area of networking technologies, including the hourglass model and the end-to-end principle.

Hedge Podcast Episode 26: Jason Gooley and CHINOG

CHINOG is a regional network operators group that meets in Chicago once a year. For this episode of the Hedge, Jason Gooley joins us to talk about the origins of CHINOG, the challenges involved in running a small conference, some tips for those who would like to start a conference of this kind, and thoughts on the importance of community in the network engineering world.

The Hedge Podcast Episode 25: Building the Next Generation of Network Engineer

If there is one thing I notice when I look around at the IETF—and many other places where I meet a lot of network operations and engineering folk—it’s that we all seem to be getting a bit older. This should lead us to an obvious question—what are we doing about bringing up a new generation of network engineers? David Huberman joins Tom Ammon and I to discuss this interesting question. David i s involved in a number of community-based efforts to train next generation network engineers, some of which he discusses in his excellent article at the APNIC blog.

The Hedge Podcast Episode 24: Single Source of Truth

Tim Schreyack recently presented at NANOG on the topic of building a single source of truth for network automation. Tim joins Tom and Russ in a wide-ranging discussion about single sources of truth, changing the way we see the network, and the changing skills of network engineers.

The Hedge Podcast Episode 23: The MOPS Working Group

The IETF works on many things beyond IP and routing—the Media Operations (MOPS) working group is gathering input on media-related operational issues and practices, including “proposed technologies related to the deployment, engineering, and operation of media streaming and manipulation protocols and procedures in the global Internet (inter-domain) and within-domain networking.” Leslie Daigle and Eric Vyncke, the co-chairs of the MOPS working group, join Alvaro Retana and Russ White to discuss the work they are doing.

The Hedge Podcast Episode 22: Challenges in Deploying IPv6 in the Enterprise

Most transit providers, content providers, and IX’s have deployed IPv6—but many enterprise network operators have not. Ed Horley joins us at the Hedge for a wide-ranging conversation on the challenges of deploying IPv6 in enterprise networks, IPv6 penetration, and other intersecting topics. Ed cohosts the IPv6 Buzz podcast at Packet Pushers, blogs at howfunky.net, and writes at the IPv6 Center of Excellence. You can also find Ed on Twitter and LinkedIn.

The Hedge Pocdcast Episode 21: Industry Standard Network Design

On this episode of the Hedge, Phil Gervasi joins Tom Ammon for a conversation that starts with industry standard network design, but ends up covering a wide range of topics.

The Hedge Podcast Episode 20: Whatever Happened to Software Defined Networking

There was a time when Software Defined Networking was going to take over the entire networking world—just like ATM, FDDI, and … so many others before. Whatever happened to SDN, anyway? What is its enduring legacy in the world of network engineering? Terry Slattery, Tom Ammon, and Russ White gather at the hedge to have a conversation about whatever happened to SDN?

The Hedge Podcast Episode 19: Optional Security is not Optional

Brian Trammell joins Alvaro Retana and Russ White to discuss his IETF draft Optional Security Is Not An Option, and why optional security is very difficult to deploy in practice. Brian blogs at http://trammell.ch and also writes at APNIC.

The Hedge Podcast Episode 18: Programming Fundamentals for Network Engineers

Network engineers do not need to become full-time coders to succeed—but some coding skills are really useful. In this episode of the Hedge, David Barrosso (you can find David’s github repositories here), Phill Simmonds, and Russ White discuss which programming skills are useful for network engineers.