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Weekend reads 031618: Notes on memcache, GDPR and whois, and the end of Symantec certificates

ICANN has consistently said its intention in complying with the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is to comply while at the same time maintaining access to the WHOIS domain name registration database “to greatest extent possible.” On February 28, ICANN published its proposed model. —Brian Winterfeldt @CircleID

We previously announced plans to deprecate Chrome’s trust in the Symantec certificate authority (including Symantec-owned brands like Thawte, VeriSign, Equifax, GeoTrust, and RapidSSL). This post outlines how site operators can determine if they’re affected by this deprecation, and if so, what needs to be done and by when. Failure to replace these certificates will result in site breakage in upcoming versions of major browsers, including Chrome. @Google

I’ve been prompted to write this brief opinion piece in response to a recent article posted on CircleID by Tony Rutkowski, where he characterises the IETF as a collection of “crypto zealots”. He offers the view that the IETF is behaving irresponsibly in attempting to place as much of the Internet’s protocols behind session level encryption as it possibly can. He argues that ETSI’s work on middlebox security protocols is a more responsible approach, and the enthusiastic application of TLS in IETF protocol standards will only provide impetus for regulators to coerce network operators to actively block TLS sessions in their networks. —Geoff Huston @potaroo

I thought I’d write up some notes on the memcached DDoS. Specifically, I describe how many I found scanning the Internet with masscan, and how to use masscan as a killswitch to neuter the worst of the attacks. @Errata Security

How good are you at telling the difference between domain names you know and trust and impostor or look-alike domains? The answer may depend on how familiar you are with the nuances of internationalized domain names (IDNs), as well as which browser or Web application you’re using. @Krebs on Security

Hackers have found a way to amplify distributed denial-of-service attacks by an unprecedented 51,000 times their original strength in a development that whitehats say could lead to new record-setting assaults that take out websites and Internet infrastructure. —Dan Goodin @ArsTechnica

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