Hedge 098: DRIP with Stuart Card

1 September 2021 | Comments Off on Hedge 098: DRIP with Stuart Card

Drones are becoming—and in many cases have already become—an everyday part of our lives. Drones are used in warfare, delivery services, photography, and recreation. One of the problems facing the world of drones, however, is the strong tie-in between the controller and the drone; this proprietary link limits innovation and reduces the information available to public officials to manage traffic, and even to protect the privacy of drone operators. The DRIP working group is building protocols designed to standardize the drone-to-controller interface, advancing the state of the art in drones and opening up the field for innovation. Stuart Card joins Alvaro Retana and Russ White to discuss DRIP.

Hedge 92: The IETF isn’t the Standards Police

21 July 2021 | Comments Off on Hedge 92: The IETF isn’t the Standards Police

In most areas of life, where the are standards, there is some kind of enforcing agency. For instance, there are water standards, and there is a water department that enforces these standards. There are electrical standards, and there is an entire infrastructure of organizations that make certain the fewest number of people are electrocuted as possible each year. What about Internet standards? Most people are surprised when they realize there is no such thing as a “standards police” in the Internet.

Listen in as George Michaelson, Evyonne Sharp, Tom Ammon, and Russ White discuss the reality of standards enforcement in the Internet ecosystem.

The Hedge 77: The Internet is for End Users

1 April 2021 | Comments Off on The Hedge 77: The Internet is for End Users

When the interests of the end user, the operator, and the vendor come into conflict, who should protocol developers favor? According to RFC8890, the needs and desires of the end user should be the correct answer. Mark Nottingham joins Alvaro Retana and Russ White on this episode of the Hedge to discuss why the Internet is for end users.

The Hedge 61: Pascal Thubert and the RAW Working Group

25 November 2020 | Comments Off on The Hedge 61: Pascal Thubert and the RAW Working Group

RAW is a new working group recently chartered by the IETF to work on “high reliability and availability for IP connectivity over a wireless medium. RAW extends the DetNet Working Group concepts to provide for high reliability and availability for an IP network utilizing scheduled wireless segments and other media…”

The Hedge 53: Deprecating Interdomain ASM

23 September 2020 | Comments Off on The Hedge 53: Deprecating Interdomain ASM

Interdomain Any-source Multicast has proven to be an unscalable solution, and is actually blocking the deployment of other solutions. To move interdomain multicast forward, Lenny Giuliano, Tim Chown, and Toerless Eckhert wrote RFC 8815, BCP 229, recommending providers “deprecate the use of Any-Source Multicast (ASM) for interdomain multicast, leaving Source-Specific Multicast (SSM) as the recommended interdomain mode of multicast.”

The Hedge 44: Pete Lumbis and Open Source

15 July 2020 | Comments Off on The Hedge 44: Pete Lumbis and Open Source

Open source software is everywhere, it seems—and yet it’s nowhere at the same time. Everyone is talking about it, but how many people and organizations are actually using it? Pete Lumbis at NVIDIA joins Tom Ammon and Russ White to discuss the many uses and meanings of open source software in the networking world.

The Hedge 39: Dan York and Open Standards Everywhere

10 June 2020 |

The Internet Society exists to support the growth of the global ‘net across the world by working with stakeholders, building local connectivity like IXs and community based networks, and encouraging the use of open standards. On this episode of the Hedge, Dan York joins us to talk about the Open Standards Everywhere project which is part of the Internet Society.

The Hedge 37: Stephane Bortzmeyer and DNS Privacy

27 May 2020 | Comments Off on The Hedge 37: Stephane Bortzmeyer and DNS Privacy

In this episode of the Hedge, Stephane Bortzmeyer joins Alvaro Retana and Russ White to discuss draft-ietf-dprive-rfc7626-bis, which “describes the privacy issues associated with the use of the DNS by Internet users.” Not many network engineers think about the privacy implications of DNS, a important part of the infrastructure we all rely on to make the Internet work.

The Hedge 34: Andrew Alston and the IETF

6 May 2020 | Comments Off on The Hedge 34: Andrew Alston and the IETF

Stop Using the OSI Model

2 September 2019 |

We all use the OSI model to describe the way networks work. I have, in fact, included it in just about every presentation, and every book I have written, someplace in the fundamentals of networking. But if you have every looked at the OSI model and had to scratch your head trying to figure out how it really fits with the networks we operate today, or what the OSI model is telling you in terms of troubleshooting, design, or operation—you are not alone. Lots of people have scratched their heads about the OSI model, trying to understand how it fits with modern networking. There is a reason this is so difficult to figure out.

The OSI Model does not accurately describe networks.

What set me off in this particular direction this week is an article over at Errata Security:

The OSI Model was created by international standards organization for an alternative internet that was too complicated to ever work, and which never worked, and which never came to pass. Sure, when they created the OSI Model, the Internet layered model already existed, so they made sure to include today’s Internet as part of their model. But the focus and intent of the OSI’s efforts was on dumb networking concepts that worked differently from the Internet.