If you haven’t found the tradeoffs …

One of the big movements in the networking world is disaggregation—splitting the control plane and other applications that make the network “go” from the hardware and the network operating system. This is, in fact, one of the movements I’ve been arguing in favor of for many years—and I’m not about to change my perspective on the topic. There are many different arguments in favor of breaking the software from the hardware. The arguments for splitting hardware from software and componentizing software are so strong that much of the 5G transition also involves the open RAN, which is a disaggregated stack for edge radio networks.

If you’ve been following my work for any amount of time, you know what comes next: If you haven’t found the tradeoffs, you haven’t looked hard enough.

This article on hardening Linux (you should go read it, I’ll wait ’til you get back) exposes some of the complexities and tradeoffs involved in disaggregation in the area of security. Some further thoughts on hardening Linux here, as well. Two points.

First, disaggregation has serious advantages, but disaggregation is also hard work. With a commercial implementation you wouldn’t necessarily think about these kinds of supply chain issues. This is an example of the state/optimization/surfaces tradeoff. You can optimize your network more fully using disaggregation techniques, but there are going to be more interaction surfaces, and there’s going to be more state to deal with (for instance, the security state on individual devices).

There are several items on this list that also illustrate the state/optimization/surfaces tradeoff. For instance, eBPF is on the list of things to disable … but eBPF is probably going to be crucial to many future network-facing implementations. Anything that’s useful is going to inherently create attack surfaces you need to deal with. Get over it.

Second, just because you don’t think about these issues with a commercial implementation does not mean you don’t need to think about these things—it just means these kinds of things are opaque to you. Rather than trying to do the “right thing” yourself, you are outsourcing this work to a vendor. This is often a rational decision, and even might often be the right decision, but it’s a decision. We often “bury” these kinds of decisions in our thinking, not realizing we are making tradeoffs.

2 Comments

  1. christopher on 27 April 2021 at 12:07 am

    I think you were supposed to put a link here Russ “This article on hardening Linux (you should go read it, I’ll wait ’til you get back)”…..otherwise you will wait for me to get back while the truth is I don’t know where to goπŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚



    • Russ on 27 April 2021 at 7:11 am

      Ugh! Thanks for pointing that out … fixed it. πŸ™‚