The word on the street is that everyone—especially network engineers—must learn to code. A conversation with a friend and an article passing through my RSS reader brought this to mind once again—so once more into the breach. Part of the problem here is that we seem to have a knack for asking the wrong question. When we look at network engineer skill sets, we often think about the ability to configure a protocol or set of features, and then the ability to quickly troubleshoot those protocols or features using a set of commands or techniques.

This is, in some sense, what various certifications have taught us—we have reached the expert level when we can configure a network quickly, or when we can prove we understand a product line. There is, by the way, a point of truth in this. If you claim your expertise is with a particular vendor’s gear, then it is true that you must be able to configure and troubleshoot on that vendor’s gear to be an expert. There is also a problem of how to test for networking skills without actually implementing something, and how to implement things without actually configuring them. This is a problem we are discussing in the new “certification” I’ve been working on, as well.

This is also, in some sense, what the hiring processes we use have taught us. Computers like to classify things in clear and definite ways. The only clear and definite way to classify networking skills is by asking questions like “what protocols do you understand how to configure and troubleshoot?” It is, it seems, nearly impossible to test design or communication skills in a way that can be easily placed on a resume.

Coding, I think, is one of those skills that is easy to appear to measure accurately, and it’s also something the entire world insists is the “coming thing.” No coding skills, no job. So it’s easy to ask the easy question—what languages do you know, how many lines of code have you written, etc. But again, this is the wrong question (or these are the wrong questions).

What is the right question? In terms of coding skills, more along the lines of something like, “do you know how to build and use tools to solve business problems?” I phrase it this way because the one thing I have noticed about every really good coder I have known is they all spend as much time building tools as they do building shipping products. They build tools to test their code, or to modify the code they’ve already written en masse, etc. In fact, the excellent coders I know treat functions like tools—if they have to drive a nail twice, they stop and create a hammer rather than repeating the exercise with some other tool.

So why is coding such an important skill to gain and maintain for the network engineer? This paragraph seems to sum it up nicely for me—

“Coding is not the fundamental skill,” writes startup founder and ex-Microsoft program manager Chris Granger. What matters, he argues, is being able to model problems and use computers to solve them. ”We don’t want a generation of people forced to care about Unicode and UI toolkits. We want a generation of writers, biologists, and accountants that can leverage computers.”

It’s not the coding that matters, it’s “being able to model problems and use computers to solve them.” This is the essence of tool building or engineering—seeing the problem, understanding the problem, and then thinking through (sometimes by trial and error) how to build a tool that will solve the problem in a consistent, easy to manage way. I fear that network engineers are taking their attitude of configuring things and automating it to make the configuration and troubleshooting faster. We seem to end up asking “how do I solve the problem of making the configuration of this network faster,” rather than asking “what business problem am I trying to solve?”

To make effective use of the coding skills we’re telling everyone to learn, we need to go back to basics and understand the problems we’re trying to solve—and the set of possible solutions we can use to solve those problems. Seen this way, the routing protocol becomes “just another tool,” just like a function call, that can be used to solve a specific set of problems—instead of a set of configuration lines that we invoke like a magic incantation to make things happen.

Coding skills are important—but they require the right mindset if we’re going to really gain the sorts of efficiencies we think are possible.

3 Comments

  1. Hussain Syed on 15 September 2020 at 2:29 am

    Bravo!Thats like an Antidote to all the Code of Misconduct – (pun intended)



  2. Tim Fiola on 15 September 2020 at 9:42 am

    Well said!!



  3. Daniel Justice on 15 September 2020 at 9:57 am

    I don’t think that all network engineers need to learn to code (this is coming from a full-time developer). I feel like this mentality is being pushed by organizations looking for people with every skill under the sun. This is the networking equivalent of the “10x developer” or the “full-stack developer”. People can’t know everything, and certainly can’t do everything well! Maybe networking teams of the future have more developers than network engineers, but I strongly believe that they will need both. The skill sets are quite different, but they complement each other very well. I rely heavily on the expertise of my network engineer teammates. They fuss with protocols and design and speeds and feeds. They don’t care so much about error-handling, modularity, or concurrency issues that I face. The most successful teams, in my opinion, are those that are built from diverse skill sets. Self-organizing groups that know how to get things done.