The Hedge 77: The Internet is for End Users

When the interests of the end user, the operator, and the vendor come into conflict, who should protocol developers favor? According to RFC8890, the needs and desires of the end user should be the correct answer. According to the RFC:

As the Internet increasingly mediates essential functions in societies, it has unavoidably become profoundly political; it has helped people overthrow governments, revolutionize social orders, swing elections, control populations, collect data about individuals, and reveal secrets. It has created wealth for some individuals and companies while destroying that of others. All of this raises the question: For whom do we go through the pain of gathering rough consensus and writing running code?

Mark Nottingham joins Alvaro Retana and Russ White on this episode of the Hedge to discuss why the Internet is for end users.

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The Hedge 61: Pascal Thubert and the RAW Working Group

RAW is a new working group recently chartered by the IETF to work on:

…high reliability and availability for IP connectivity over a wireless medium. RAW extends the DetNet Working Group concepts to provide for high reliability and availability for an IP network utilizing scheduled wireless segments and other media, e.g., frequency/time-sharing physical media resources with stochastic traffic: IEEE Std. 802.15.4 timeslotted channel hopping (TSCH), 3GPP 5G ultra-reliable low latency communications (URLLC), IEEE 802.11ax/be, and L-band Digital Aeronautical Communications System (LDACS), etc. Similar to DetNet, RAW will stay abstract to the radio layers underneath, addressing the Layer 3 aspects in support of applications requiring high reliability and availability.

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The Hedge 53: Deprecating Interdomain ASM

Interdomain Any-source Multicast has proven to be an unscalable solution, and is actually blocking the deployment of other solutions. To move interdomain multicast forward, Lenny Giuliano, Tim Chown, and Toerless Eckert wrote RFC 8815, BCP 229, recommending providers “deprecate the use of Any-Source Multicast (ASM) for interdomain multicast, leaving Source-Specific Multicast (SSM) as the recommended interdomain mode of multicast.”

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The Hedge 44: Pete Lumbis and Open Source

Open source software is everywhere, it seems—and yet it’s nowhere at the same time. Everyone is talking about it, but how many people and organizations are actually using it? Pete Lumbis at NVIDIA joins Tom Ammon and Russ White to discuss the many uses and meanings of open source software in the networking world.

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The Hedge 39: Dan York and Open Standards Everywhere

The Internet Society exists to support the growth of the global ‘net across the world by working with stakeholders, building local connectivity like IXs and community based networks, and encouraging the use of open standards. On this episode of the Hedge, Dan York joins us to talk about the Open Standards Everywhere project which is part of the Internet Society. More information about Open Standards Everywhere can be found—

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The Hedge 37: Stephane Bortzmeyer and DNS Privacy

In this episode of the Hedge, Stephane Bortzmeyer joins Alvaro Retana and Russ White to discuss draft-ietf-dprive-rfc7626-bis, which “describes the privacy issues associated with the use of the DNS by Internet users.” Not many network engineers think about the privacy implications of DNS, a important part of the infrastructure we all rely on to make the Internet work.

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The Hedge 34: Andrew Alston and the IETF

Complaining about how slow the IETF is, or how single vendors dominate the standards process, is almost a by-game in the world of network engineering going back to the very beginning. It is one thing to complain; it is another to understand the structure of the problem and make practical suggestions about how to fix it. Join us at the Hedge as Andrew Alston, Tom Ammon, and Russ White reveal some of the issues, and brainstorm how to fix them.

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