Upcoming Live Training: Data Center Fabrics

I’ve rebuilt my data center fabrics live training class, adding a lot of new material across the board, and adding a few new topics. To cover all this new material, the class has been expanded from three to six hours. I’m teaching it for the first time on the 29th and 30th of this month.

Register here.

From the Safari Books description—

Data centers are the foundation of the cloud, whether private, public, on the edge, or in the center of the network. This training will focus on topologies and control planes, including scale, performance, and centralization. This training is important for network designers and operators who want to understand the elements of data center design that apply across all hardware and software types.

This class consists of two three-hour sessions. The first session will focus on the physical topology, including a short history of spine-and-leaf fabrics, the characteristics of fabrics (versus the broader characteristics of a network), and laying out a spine-and-leaf network to support fabric lifecycle and scaling the network out. The first session will also consider the positive and negative aspects of using single- and multi-forwarding engine (FE) devices to build a fabric, and various aspects of fabric resilience.

The second session will begin with transport considerations and quality of experience. The session will then consider underlay control planes, including BGP and IS-IS, and the positive and negative aspects of each. Routing to the host and the interaction between the control plane and automation will be considered in this session, as well. EVPN as an overlay control plane will be considered next, and finally the relationship between security and control plane design will be examined.

IEEE Conference on Network Softwarization

I’m moderating a panel at the upcoming IEEE Conference on Network Softwarization. This is one of the various “good sources” out there for understanding what might be coming in the future for computer networks. The conference is hybrid, so you can register and watch the sessions live from the comfort of your home (or office).

I’m moderating the distinguished experts panel on the afternoon of the 30th.

Please register here.

How the Internet Really Works

Gentle reminder that I’m teaching a three-hour webinar on Safari Books this coming Friday on Internet operations. The course is roughly divided into three parts.

The first part covers DNS operations, including a high-level overview of how DNS works and some thoughts on how DNS providers “work” financially. The second part is a high-level overview of packet transport, focusing on routing, the different kinds of providers, and how each of of the different kinds of providers “work” financially. The third part is a collection of other odds and ends.

You can register here.

Anyone who registers is able to watch a recorded version of the training afterwords.

I’m teaching part 2 next month, which I call Navigating the DFZ.

Live Training: How Routers Really Work

On the 27th of May, I’ll be teaching a three-hour course called How Routers Really Work? From the course description:

This training will peer into the internal components of a router, starting with an explanation of how a router switches packets. This walk through of a switching path, in turn, will be used as a foundation for explaining the components of a router, including the various tables used to build forwarding tables and the software components used to build these tables.

Sign up here.

Upcoming Training: Network Troubleshooting

I’m teaching a three-hour webinar on troubleshooting on the 22nd of April:

This training focuses on the half-split system of troubleshooting, which is widely used in the electronic and civil engineering domains. The importance of tracing the path of the signal, using models to put the system in context, and the use of a simple troubleshooting “loop” to focus on asking how, what, and why are added to the half-split method to create a complete theory of troubleshooting. Other concepts covered in this course are the difference between permanent and temporary fixes and a review of measuring reliability. The final third of the course contains several practical examples of working through problems to help in applying the theory covered in the first two sections to the real world.

This is offered on Safari Books Online through Pearson. I think that if you register for the course, you can watch a recording later.

Register here.