How the Internet Really Works Part 2

I’m a little late in posting this, but I thought I’d put it out here anyway. Tomorrow I’m teaching through a three-hour webinar, How the Internet Really Works part 2. From the session description—

This training will provide short reviews of many of these systems and a deeper look at the many tools network engineers can use to discover the information they need to navigate through the DNS and routing systems on the global Internet. This training will be arranged as a set of case studies posing a problem, and then working through tools available to gather the information needed to understand the problem.

You can register here.

Upcoming Webinar: How the Internet Really Works (Part 1)

This live training will provide an overview of the systems, providers, and standards bodies important to the operation of the global Internet, including the Domain Name System (DNS), the routing and transport systems, standards bodies, and registrars. For DNS, the process of a query will be considered in some detail, who pays for each server used in the resolution process, and tools engineers can use to interact DNS. For routing and transport, the role of each kind of provider will be considered, along with how they make money to cover their costs, and how engineers can interact with the global routing table (the Default Free Zone, of DFZ). Finally, registrars and standards bodies will be considered, including their organizational structure, how they generate revenue, and how to find their standards.

Live Webinar: How Routers Really Work

This Friday (the 12th) I’m presenting a live webinar on How Routers Really Work over at Pearson. From the description:

This training will peer into the internal components of a router, starting with an explanation of how a router switches packets. This walk through of a switching path, in turn, will be used as a foundation for explaining the components of a router, including the various tables used to build forwarding tables and the software components used to build these tables.

Please join me by registering here.

I’ve changed just a few of the slides from the last time I gave this talk and reordered some things.

Master Class: Resilience in Large-Scale Fabrics

In the aftermath of a major network outage, the natural reaction of most network engineers is to find some way to avoid all future outages—regardless of the cost. The first line of defense against is future outages is redundancy, whether in the form of additional parallel links, new routers, new firewalls, new … whatever, so long as there is more of it so packets have more paths to make it from source to destination.

Please join me for this live webinar.

Live Stream: The Journey to Architect

On Thursday the 19th of October at 1PM ET, I’ll be joining Keith Bogart for the em>INE Live live stream. You can find the details on their web site.

In this session, Keith Bogart will interview prolific author and Network Architect, Russ White Ph.D. One of only a handful of people who have attained CCAr status, Russ White has authored several books such as “Practical BGP”, “The Art of Network Architecture” and “Computer Networking Problems And Solutions”. During this session we’ll find out about his journey to becoming a Network Architect and how his passion for technology can inspire you!

Troubleshooting Webinar this Friday

I’m teaching my troubleshooting webinar this Friday. I’ve revamped the slides entirely, so this will likely be a big change for anyone who’s attended previous versions of this. Three hours, 109 slides, and interaction through the chat window … all to develop some really good skills in how to troubleshoot. For those who are curious, I was taught formal troubleshooting skills in my early life in electronics, learning my lessons on ILS, RADAR, and radio systems of various kinds. This webinar is my adaptation of those skills for network engineers.

You can register here.