Before I continue, I want to remind you what the purpose of this little series of posts is. The point is not to convince you to never use BGP in the DC underlay ever again. There’s a lot of BGP deployed out there, and there are lot of tools that assume BGP in the underlay. I doubt any of that is going to change. The point is to make you stop and think!

Why are we deploying BGP in this way? Is this the right long-term solution? Should we, as a community, be rethinking our desire to use BGP for everything? Are we just “following the crowd” because … well … we think it’s what the “cool kids” are doing, or because “following the crowd” is what we always seem to do?

In my last post, I argued that BGP converges much more slowly than the other options available for the DC fabric underlay control plane. The pushback I received was two-fold. First, the overlay converges fast enough; the underlay convergence time does not really factor into overall convergence time. Second, there are ways to fix things.

If the first pushback is always true—the speed of the underlay control plane convergence does not matter—then why have an underlay control plane at all? Why not just use a single, merged, control plane for both underlay and overlay? Or … to be a little more shocking, if the speed at which the underlay control plane converges does not matter, why not just configure the entire underlay using … static routes?

The reason we use a dynamic underlay control plane is because we need this foundational connectivity for something. So long as we need this foundational connectivity for something, then that something is always going to be better if it is faster rather than slower.

The second pushback is more interesting. Essentially—because we work on virtual things rather than physical ones, just about anything can be adapted to serve any purpose. I can, for instance, replace BGP’s bestpath algorithm with Dijkstra’s SPF, and BGP’s packet format with a more straight-forward TLV format emulating a link-state protocol, and then say, “see, now BGP looks just like a link-state protocol … I made BGP work really well on a DC fabric.”

Yes, of course you can do these things. Somewhere along the way we became convinced that we are being really clever when we adapt a protocol to do something it wasn’t designed to do, but I’m not certain this is a good way of going about building reliable systems. 

Okay, back to the point … the next reason we should rethink BGP on the DC fabric is because it is complex to configure when its being used as an IGP. In my last post, when discussing the configuration required to make BGP converge, I noted AS numbers and AS Path filters must be laid out in a very specific way, following where each device is located in the fabric. The MRAI must be taken down to some minimum on every device (either 0 or 1 second), and individual peers must be configured.

Further, if you are using a version of BGP that follows the IETF’s BCPs for the protocol, you must configure some sort of filter (generally a permit all) to get a BGP speaker to advertise anything to an eBGP peer. If you’re using iBGP, you need to configure route reflectors and tell BGP to advertise multiple paths.

There are two ways to solve this problem. First, you can automate all this configuration—of course! I am a huge fan of automation. It’s an important tool because it can make your network consistent and more secure.

But I’m also realistic enough to know that adding the complexity of an automation system on top of a too-complex system to make things simpler is probably not a really good idea. To give a visual example, consider the possibility of automatically wiping your mouth while eating soup.

Yes, automation can be taken too far. A good rule of thumb might be: automation works best on systems intentionally designed to be simple enough to automate. In this case, perhaps it would be simpler to just use a protocol more directly designed so solve the problem at hand, rather than trying to automate our way out of the problem.

Second, you can modify BGP to be a better fit for use as an IGP in various ways. This post has already run far too long, however, so … I’ll hold off on talking about this until the next post.