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IPv6 Backscatter and Address Space Scanning

Backscatter is often used to detect various kinds of attacks, but how does it work? The paper under review today, Who Knocks at the IPv6 Door, explains backscatter usage in IPv4, and examines how effectively this technique might be used to detect scanning of IPv6 addresses, as well. The best place to begin is with an explanation of backscatter itself; the following network diagram will be helpful—

Assume A is scanning the IPv4 address space for some reason—for instance, to find some open port on a host, or as part of a DDoS attack. When A sends an unsolicited packet to C, a firewall (or some similar edge filtering device), C will attempt to discover the source of this packet. It could be there is some local policy set up allowing packets from A, or perhaps A is part of some domain none of the devices from C should be connecting to. IN order to discover more, the firewall will perform a reverse lookup. To do this, C takes advantage of the PTR DNS record, looking up the IP address to see if there is an associated domain name (this is explained in more detail in my How the Internet Really Works webinar, which I give every six months or so). This reverse lookup generates what is called a backscatter—these backscatter events can be used to find hosts scanning the IP address space. Sometimes these scans are innocent, such as a web spider searching for HTML servers; other times, they could be a prelude to some sort of attack.

Kensuke Fukuda and John Heidemann. 2018. Who Knocks at the IPv6 Door?: Detecting IPv6 Scanning. In Proceedings of the Internet Measurement Conference 2018 (IMC ’18). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 231-237. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/3278532.3278553

Scanning the IPv6 address space is much more difficult because there are 2128 addresses rather than 232. The paper under review here is one of the first attempts to understand backscatter in the IPv6 address space, which can lead to a better understanding of the ways in which IPv6 scanners are optimizing their search through the larger address space, and also to begin understanding how backscatter can be used in IPv6 for many of the same purposes as it is in IPv4.

The researchers begin by setting up a backscatter testbed across a subset of hosts for which IPv4 backscatter information is well-known. They developed a set of heuristics for identifying the kind of service or host performing the reverse DNS lookup, classifying them into major services, content delivery networks, mail servers, etc. They then examined the number of reverse DNS lookups requested versus the number of IP packets each received.

It turns out that about ten times as many backscatter incidents are reported for IPv4 than IPv6, which either indicates that IPv6 hosts perform reverse lookup requests about ten times less often than IPv4 hosts, or IPv6 hosts are ten times less likely to be monitored for backscatter events. Either way, this result is not promising—it appears, on the surface, that IPv6 hosts will be less likely to cause backscatter events, or IPv6 backscatter events are ten times less likely to be reported. This could indicate that widespread deployment of IPv6 will make it harder to detect various kinds of attacks on the DFZ. A second result from this research is that using backscatter, the researchers determined IPv6 scanning is increasing over time; while the IPv6 space is not currently a prime target for attacks, it might become more so over time, if the scanning rate is any indicator.

The bottom line is—IPv6 hosts need to be monitored as closely, or more closely than IPv6 hosts, for scanning events. The techniques used for scanning the IPv6 address space are not well understood at this time, either.

 

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