If you are looking for a good resolution for 2020 still (I know, it’s a bit late), you can’t go wrong with this one: this year, I will focus on making the networks and products I work on truly simpler. Now, before you pull Tom’s take out on me—

There are those that would say that what we’re doing is just hiding the complexity behind another layer of abstraction, which is a favorite saying of Russ White. I’d argue that we’re not hiding the complexity as much as we’re putting it back where it belongs – out of sight. We don’t need the added complexity for most operations.

Three things: First, complex solutions are always required for hard problems. If you’ve ever listened to me talk about complexity, you’ve probably seen this quote on a slide someplace—

[C]omplexity is most succinctly discussed in terms of functionality and its robustness. Specifically, we argue that complexity in highly organized systems arises primarily from design strategies intended to create robustness to uncertainty in their environments and component parts.

You cannot solve hard problems—complex problems—without complex solutions. In fact, a lot of the complexity we run into in our everyday lives is a result of saying “this is too complex, I’m going to build something simpler.” (here I’m thinking of a blog post I read last year that said “when we were building containers, we looked at routing and realized how complex it was… so we invented something simpler… which, of course, turned out to be more complex than dynamic routing!)

Second, abstraction can be used the right way to manage complexity, and it can be used the wrong way to obfuscate or mask complexity. The second great source of complexity and system failure in our world is we don’t abstract complexity so much as we obfuscate it.

Third, abstraction is not a zero-sum game. If you haven’t found the tradeoffs, you haven’t looked hard enough. This is something expressed through the state/optimization/surface triangle, which you should know at this point.

Returning to the top of this post, the point is this: Using abstraction to manage complexity is fine. Obfuscation of complexity is not. Papering over complexity “just because I can” never solves the problem, any more than sweeping dirt under the rug, or papering over the old paint without bothering to fix the wall first.

We need to go beyond just figuring out how to make the user interface simpler, more “intent-driven,” automated, or whatever it is. We need to think of the network as a system, rather than as a collection of bits and bobs that we’ve thrown together across the years. We need to think about the modules horizontally and vertically, think about how they interact, understand how each piece works, understand how each abstraction leaks, and be able to ask hard questions.

For each module, we need to understand how things work well enough to ask is this the right place to divide these two modules? We should be willing to rethink our abstraction lines, the placement of modules, and how things fit together. Sometimes moving an abstraction point around can greatly simplify a design while increasing optimal behavior. Other times it’s worth it to reduce optimization to build a simpler mouse trap. But you cannot know the answer to this question until you ask it. If you’re sweeping complexity under the rug because… well, that’s where it belongs… then you are doing yourself and the organization you work for a disfavor, plain and simple. Whatever you sweep under the rug of obfuscation will grow and multiply. You don’t want to be around when it crawls back out from under that rug.

For each module, we need to learn how to ask is this the right level and kind of abstraction? We need to learn to ask does the set of functions this module is doing really “hang together,” or is this just a bunch of cruft no-one could figure out what to do with, so they shoved it all in a black box and called it done?

Above all, we need to learn to look at the network as a system. I’ve been harping on this for so long, and yet I still don’t think people understand what I am saying a lot of times. So I guess I’ll just have to keep saying it. 😊

The problems networks are designed to solve are hard—therefore, networks are going to be complex. You cannot eliminate complexity, but you can learn to minimize and control it. Abstraction within a well-thought-out system is a valid and useful way to control complexity and understanding how and where to create modules at the edges of which abstraction can take place is a valid and useful way of controlling complexity.

Don’t obfuscate. Think systemically, think about the tradeoffs, and abstract wisely.