Complexity Reduction?

19 April 2021 |

Back in January, I ran into an interesting article called The many lies about reducing complexity:

Reducing complexity sells. Especially managers in IT are sensitive to it as complexity generally is their biggest headache. Hence, in IT, people are in a perennial fight to make the complexity bearable.

Loose Lips

12 April 2021 | Comments Off on Loose Lips

When I was in the military we were constantly drilled about the problem of Essential Elements of Friendly Information, or EEFIs. What are EEFis? If an adversary can cast a wide net of surveillance, they can often find multiple clues about what you are planning to do, or who is making which decisions. For instance, if several people married to military members all make plans to be without their spouses for a long period of time, the adversary can be certain a unit is about to be deployed. If the unit of each member can be determined, then the strength, positioning, and other facts about what action you are taking can be guessed.

Time and Mind Savers: RSS Feeds

5 April 2021 |

I began writing this post just to remind readers this blog does have a number of RSS feeds—but then I thought … well, I probably need to explain why that piece of information is important.

The amount of writing, video, and audio being thrown at the average person today is astounding—so much so that, according to a lot of research, most people in the digital world have resorted to relying on social media as their primary source of news. Why do most people get their news from social media? I’m pretty convinced this is largely a matter of “it saves time.” The resulting feed might not be “perfect,” but it’s “close enough,” and no-one wants to spend time seeking out a wide variety of news sources so they will be better informed.

The Insecurity of Ambiguous Standards

29 March 2021 | Comments Off on The Insecurity of Ambiguous Standards

Why are networks so insecure?

One reason is we don’t take network security seriously. We just don’t think of the network as a serious target of attack. Or we think of security as a problem “over there,” something that exists in the application realm, that needs to be solved by application developers. Or we think the consequences of a network security breach as “well, they can DDoS us, and then we can figure out how to move load around, so if we build with resilience (enough redundancy) we’re already taking care of our security issues.” Or we put our trust in the firewall, which sits there like some magic box solving all our problems.

It is Always Something (RFC1925, Rule 7)

23 March 2021 | Comments Off on It is Always Something (RFC1925, Rule 7)

While those working in the network engineering world are quite familiar with the expression “it is always something!,” defining this (often exasperated) declaration is a little trickier. The wise folks in the IETF, however, have provided a definition in RFC1925. Rule 7, “it is always something,” is quickly followed with a corollary, rule 7a, which says: “Good, Fast, Cheap: Pick any two (you can’t have all three).”

Slow Learning and Range

22 March 2021 |

Jack of all trades, master of none.

This singular saying—a misquote of Benjamin Franklin (more on this in a moment)—is the defining statement of our time. An alternative form might be the fox knows many small things, but the hedgehog knows one big thing.

Complexity Bites Back

15 March 2021 |

What percentage of business-impacting application outages are caused by networks? According to a recent survey by the Uptime Institute, about 30% of the 300 operators they surveyed, 29% have experienced network related outages in the last three years—the highest percentage of causes for IT failures across the period.

A secondary question on the survey attempted to “dig a little deeper” to understand the reasons for network failure; the chart below shows the result.

You Can Always Add Another Layer of Indirection (RFC1925, Rule 6a)

9 March 2021 | Comments Off on You Can Always Add Another Layer of Indirection (RFC1925, Rule 6a)

Many within the network engineering community have heard of the OSI seven-layer model, and some may have heard of the Recursive Internet Architecture (RINA) model. The truth is, however, that while protocol designers may talk about these things and network designers study them, very few networks today are built using any of these models. What is often used instead is what might be called the Infinitely Layered Functional Indirection (ILFI) model of network engineering. In this model, nothing is solved at a particular layer of the network if it can be moved to another layer, whether successfully or not.

On Using the Right Word

8 March 2021 |

A while back, I was sitting in a meeting where the presenter described switching from a “traditional, hierarchical data center fabric” to a spine-and-leaf (while drawing CLOS, in all capital letters, on the whiteboard). He pointed out that the spine-and-leaf design is simpler because it only has two tiers rather than three.

There is so much wrong with this I almost winced in physical pain. Traditional hierarchical designs are not fabrics. Spine-and-leaf fabrics are not CLOS, but Clos, fabrics. Clos fabrics have three stages, not two—even if we draw them “folded” so you only see two apparent levels to the fabric. In fact, all spine-and-leaf fabrics always have an odd number of stages, and they are stages, not tiers.

Rethinking BGP on the DC Fabric (part 5)

1 March 2021 | Comments Off on Rethinking BGP on the DC Fabric (part 5)

BGP is widely used as an IGP in the underlay of modern DC fabrics. This series argues this is not the best long-term solution to the problem of routing in fabrics because BGP is not ideal for this use case. This post will consider the potential harm we are doing to the larger Internet by pressing BGP into a role it was not originally designed to fulfill—an underlay protocol or an IGP.

My last post described the kinds of configuration required to make BGP work on a DC fabric—it turns out that the configuration of each BGP speaker on the fabric is close to unique. It is possible to automate configuring each speaker—but it would be better if we could get closer to autonomic operation.