Deterministic Networking and New IP

10 August 2020 |

For those not following the current state of the ITU, a proposal has been put forward to (pretty much) reorganize the standards body around “New IP.” Don’t be confused by the name—it’s exactly what it sounds like, a proposal for an entirely new set of transport protocols to replace the current IPv4/IPv6/TCP/QUIC/routing protocol stack nearly 100% of the networks in operation today run on. Ignoring, for the moment, the problem of replacing the entire IP infrastructure, what can we learn from this proposal?

The 4D Network

3 August 2020 |

I think we can all agree networks have become too complex—and this complexity is a result of the network often becoming the “final dumping ground” of every problem that seems like it might impact more than one system, or everything no-one else can figure out how to solve. It’s rather humorous, in fact, to see a lot of server and application folks sitting around saying “this networking stuff is so complex—let’s design something better and simpler in our bespoke overlay…” and then falling into the same complexity traps as they start facing the real problems of policy and scale.

This complexity cannot be “automated away.” It can be smeared over with intent, but we’re going to find—soon enough—that smearing intent on top of complexity just makes for a dirty kitchen and a sub-standard meal.

Smart Network or Dumb?

27 July 2020 | Comments Off on Smart Network or Dumb?

Should the network be dumb or smart? Network vendors have recently focused on making the network as smart as possible because there is a definite feeling that dumb networks are quickly becoming a commodity—and it’s hard to see where and how steep profit margins can be maintained in a commodifying market. Software vendors, on the other hand, have been encroaching on the network space by “building in” overlay network capabilities, especially in virtualization products. VMWare and Docker come immediately to mind; both are either able to, or working towards, running on a plain IP fabric, reducing the number of services provided by the network to a minimum level (of course, I’d have a lot more confidence in these overlay systems if they were a lot smarter about routing … but I’ll leave that alone for the moment).

How can this question be answered? One way is to think through what sorts of things need to be done in processing packets, and then think through where it makes most sense to do those things. Another way is to measure the accuracy or speed at which some of these “packet processing things” can be done so you can decide in a more empirical way. The paper I’m looking at today, by Anirudh et al., takes both of these paths in order to create a baseline “rule of thumb” about where to place packet processing functionality in a network.

Tradeoffs Come in Threes

20 July 2020 | Comments Off on Tradeoffs Come in Threes

We’re actually pretty good at finding, and “solving” (for some meaning of “solving,” of course), these kinds of immediately obvious tradeoffs. It’s obvious the street sweepers are going to lose their jobs if we replace them with a robot. What might not be so obvious is the loss of the presence of a person on the street. That’s a pair of eyes who can see when a child is being taken by someone who’s not a family member, a pair of ears that can hear the rumble of a car that doesn’t belong in the neighborhood, a pair of hands that can help someone who’s fallen, etc.

Zero Trust and the Cookie Metaphor

13 July 2020 | Comments Off on Zero Trust and the Cookie Metaphor

In old presentations on network security (watch this space; I’m working on a new security course for Ignition in the next six months or so), I would use a pair of chocolate chip cookies as an illustration for network security. In the old days, I’d opine, network security was like a cookie that was baked to be crunchy on the outside and gooey on the inside. Now-a-days, however, I’d say network security needs to be more like a store-bought cookie—crunchy all the way through. I always used this illustration to make a point about defense-in-depth. You cannot assume the thin crunchy security layer at the edge of your network—generally in the form of stateful packet filters and the like (okay, firewalls, but let’s leave the appliance world behind for a moment)—is what you really need.

The Network is not Free: The Case of the Connected Toaster

29 June 2020 | Comments Off on The Network is not Free: The Case of the Connected Toaster

Latency is a big deal for many modern applications, particularly in the realm of machine learning applied to problems like determining if someone standing at your door is a delivery person or a … robber out to grab all your smart toasters and big screen television. The problem is networks, particularly in the last mile don’t deal with latency very well. In fact, most of the network speeds and feeds available in anything outside urban areas kindof stinks.

Research: Off-Path TCP Attacks

22 June 2020 | Comments Off on Research: Off-Path TCP Attacks

I’s fnny, bt yu cn prbbly rd ths evn thgh evry wrd s mssng t lst ne lttr. This is because every effective language—or rather every communication system—carried enough information to reconstruct the original meaning even when bits are dropped. Over-the-wire protocols, like TCP, are no different—the protocol must carry enough information about the conversation (flow data) and the data being carried (metadata) to understand when something is wrong and error out or ask for a retransmission. These things, however, are a form of data exhaust; much like you can infer the tone, direction, and sometimes even the content of conversation just by watching the expressions, actions, and occasional word spoken by one of the participants, you can sometimes infer a lot about a conversation between two applications by looking at the amount and timing of data crossing the wire.

Measuring the Core

15 June 2020 | Comments Off on Measuring the Core

While reading through some research papers this week, I ran into a recent (2018) paper where Carisimo et al. try out different ways of measuring which autonomous systems belong to the “core” of the ‘net. They went about this by taking a set of AS’ “everyone” acknowledges to be “part of the core,” and then trying to find some measurement that successfully describes something all of them have in common.

Is QUIC really Quicker?

8 June 2020 | Comments Off on Is QUIC really Quicker?

QUIC is a relatively new data transport protocol developed by Google, and currently in line to become the default transport for the upcoming HTTP standard. Because of this, it behooves every network engineer to understand a little about this protocol, how it operates, and what impact it will have on the network. We did record a History of Networking episode on QUIC, if you want some background.

In a recent Communications of the ACM article, a group of researchers (Kakhi et al.) used a modified implementation of QUIC to measure its performance under different network conditions, directly comparing it to TCPs performance under the same conditions. Since the current implementations of QUIC use the same congestion control as TCP—Cubic—the only differences in performance should be code tuning in estimating the round-trip timer (RTT) for congestion control, QUIC’s ability to form a session in a single RTT, and QUIC’s ability to carry multiple streams in a single connection. The researchers asked two questions in this paper: how does QUIC interact with TCP flows on the same network, and does UIC perform better than TCP in all situations, or only some?

To Route or Not?

1 June 2020 | Comments Off on To Route or Not?

When you are building a data center fabric, should you run a control plane all the way to the host? This is question I encounter more often as operators deploy eVPN-based spine-and-leaf fabrics in their data centers (for those who are actually deploying scale-out spine-and-leaf—I see a lot of people deploying hybrid sorts of networks designed as “mini-hierarchical” designs and just calling them spine-and-leaf fabrics, but this is probably a topic for another day). Three reasons are generally given for deploying the control plane all on the hosts attached to the fabric: faster down detection, load sharing, and traffic engineering. Let’s consider each of these in turn.