Based on “winner-take-most” network economies, the innovation sector has generated significant technology gains and wealth but has also helped spawn a growing gap between the nation’s dynamic “superstar” metropolitan areas and most everywhere else. Neither market forces nor bottom-up economic development efforts have closed this gap, nor are they likely to. Instead, these deeply seated dynamics appear ready to exacerbate the current divides.

As we’ve discussed ad nauseam over the years, most of the missives you read about this-or-that super-scary malware/virus/brain-eating-boogie-monster are overly sensationalized accounts tied to theoretical threats with practically zero chance of actually affecting you in the real world. If you look closely, in fact, you’ll start to notice that the vast majority of those stories stem from companies that — gasp! — make their money selling malware protection programs for Android phones. (Pure coincidence, right?) —JR Raphael

As the Internet has grown, so too have the abuses that go along with one of the world’s most transformative technologies. For all of the positives the Internet brings, negatives like phishing, malware and child exploitation are a reality online. —Matt Serlin

If you are reading this, you are doing the right type of security digging. You are looking for ways to get started in the security industry. You have a desire to dive deep in the security world. Welcome to the world of chaos, excitement, long hours, uncertain rewards, and overwhelming intensity. The community of professionals who are pushing back against the badness need your help. We need people from all walks of life who love to learn. Today’s security world interconnects with everything and everyone. —Barry Greene

If you’re young or unfamiliar with the history of computing from its earliest days in the 1940s and 1950s, you’ll find it a worthwhile history lesson. This talk also includes the thesis of another talk of his — The Scribe’s Oath — in which he talks about the extreme care that ancient scribes used to put into their work, and how programmers are effectively today’s scribes. —Joey Devilla

Encryption is fundamental to our daily life. Practically everything we do online makes use of encryption is some form. Access to our financial transactions, health records, government services, and exchanged private messages are all protected by strong encryption. —Mohamed EL Bashir

In the not-too-distant future, I can clearly see how ISO 27001, SOC 2 and HITRUST certifications could become a diminished, legacy activity, viewed as a rarity left over from marketing efforts to distinguish an organization’s security posture from its competition. Absurd? Unrealistic? Actually, it is a very pragmatic understanding of what is coming with the Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification (CMMC) that the US Department of Defense (DoD) is rolling out just a few short weeks away (January 2020). —Tom Cornelius

As we begin our new decade of the 2020s, we can look back at the last 30 odd years and examine the collaboration between technology and our daily lives. If you think of your day-to-day, it’s easy to see how much our society relies on technology. Consider our smart devices such as mobile phones, watches, even homes. However, what about the technology that we don’t see, that gives us clean drinking water, removes wastewater, and keeps our homes warm? Industrial Control Systems (ICS) are often considered a part of the Critical National Infrastructure (CNI). CNI is generally classified as assets needed to keep our society and economy running as we expect, our normal. —Zoë Rose