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Weekend Reads 030918: Botnet Avalanche, DNS Security, and IoT Privacy

It’s been a busy few weeks in cybercrime news, justifying updates to a couple of cases we’ve been following closely at KrebsOnSecurity. In Ukraine, the alleged ringleader of the Avalanche malware spam botnet was arrested after eluding authorities in the wake of a global cybercrime crackdown there in 2016. @Krebs on Security

Reflection amplification is a technique that allows cyber attackers to both magnify the amount of malicious traffic they can generate, and obfuscate the sources of that attack traffic. For the past five years, this combination has been irresistible to attackers, and for good reason. —Carlos Morales @Arbor

For years, we’ve been pioneering the use of DNS to enforce security. We recognized that DNS was often a blind spot for organizations and that using DNS to enforce security was both practical and effective. Why? Because DNS isn’t optional. It’s foundational to how the internet works and and is used by every single device that connects to the network. If you’re considering using DNS for security, it’s important to understand the facts so you can combat the fiction. —Kevin Rollinson @Cisco

Attackers have seized on a relatively new method for executing distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks of unprecedented disruptive power, using it to launch record-breaking DDoS assaults over the past week. Now evidence suggests this novel attack method is fueling digital shakedowns in which victims are asked to pay a ransom to call off crippling cyberattacks. @Krebs on Security

Amazon continues to improve the Consumer IoT space, introducing more — and smarter — WIFI-enabled gadgets. Good for us, but even better for Amazon: They get both our money and our data. —Jean-Louis Gassée @Monday Note

In December, Edward Snowden unveiled a new app called Haven, which turns your Android phone into a monitoring device to detect and record activity. Snowden has pitched Haven as a safeguard against so-called evil maid attacks, in which an adversary snoops through your digital devices or installs trackers on them when you’re not around. In interviews, Snowden was clear that one group he thought might use Haven was victims of intimate partner violence, who could use it to record abusers tampering with their devices. —Karen Levy @Slate

It’s my rather controversial view that the edge will, over the longer term (10+ years), eclipse what we call the cloud: the giant centralized hyper-scale data centers, which offer a progressive set of abstractions as a service for running applications and storing data. —Chetan Venkatesh

In earlier blog posts (Looks Like We’re Upgrading Again! Dual-Rate 40G/100G BiDi Transceiver and 40/100G QSFP BiDi Transceiver’s Backward Compatibility With 40G BiDi), we introduced the dual-rate 40/100G QSFP BiDi transceiver and described how Cisco uniquely offers 40G capability and backward compatibility. Let’s review why the QSFP+ 40G BiDi was such a big hit in the first place when it was released back in 2013, and how the BiDi value proposition still makes plenty of sense. —Pat Chou @Cisco

A large number of banks, credit unions and other financial institutions just pushed customers onto new e-banking platforms that asked them to reset their account passwords by entering a username plus some other static identifier — such as the first six digits of their Social Security number (SSN), or a mix of partial SSN, date of birth and surname. Here’s a closer look at what may be going on (spoiler: small, regional banks and credit unions have grown far too reliant on the whims of just a few major online banking platform providers). —Krebs on Security

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