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Weekend Reads ‭190DA‬

By now pretty much all of online advertising is adtech, which doesn’t sponsor publishers. Instead it uses publishers to mark and track eyeballs wherever they might go. It does that by planting tracking beacons (mixed like poison blueberries into those cookies sites now require “consent” to) on readers’ browsers or phones, and then shoots the readers’ eyeballs with ads when they show up elsewhere on the Web, preferably on the cheapest possible site, so those eyeballs can be hit as often as possible within the budget the advertiser has paid adtech intermediaries. @Doc Serls Weblog

Consider, then, that most useful work relies on TCP/IP, which itself relies on the Domain Name System (DNS). We should know as much as possible about our use of the DNS, but most IT administrators are much too busy learning their specialized craft to also become experts on every enabling technology. —Paul Vixie @Dark Reading

The technology products that drive today’s businesses are increasingly produced through a highly diversified and complex international supply chain. Whether it is standard networking gear or a more specialized device like a human-machine interface or remote terminal unit, equipment is often developed through an elaborate web of OEMs, chip makers, parts suppliers, software/hardware designers, and outsourced production facilities. —Ang Cui @Dark Reading

Cybersecurity of critical energy infrastructure is a growing concern as the industry experiences a significant overhaul with grids, power, water and gas becoming increasingly smart and automated. For utility companies, the consequences of inadequate cyber security include service and grid outages affecting thousands of customers, if not more. The “fourth industrial revolution,” demands major changes in the utilities sector’s technology deployments. —Marco Berger @LightTalk

WiGig transmits data wirelessly on the 60 GHz frequency, unlike Wi-Fi 6 and other “normal” versions of Wi-Fi that use the 2.4GHz or 5GHz frequencies. The 60GHz frequency is less congested than 2.4GHz or 5GHz, which means it can transfer more data at once. —Chris Hoffman @how-to-geek

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