Knowing Where to Look

20 January 2020 |

If you haven’t found the tradeoffs, you haven’t looked hard enough. Something I say rather often—as Eyvonne would say, a “Russism.” Fair enough, and it’s easy enough to say “if you haven’t found the tradeoffs, you haven’t looked hard enough,” but what does it mean, exactly? How do you apply this to the everyday world of designing, deploying, operating, and troubleshooting networks?

Humans tend to extremes in their thoughts. In many cases, we end up considering everything a zero-sum game, where any gain on the part of someone else means an immediate and opposite loss on my part. In others, we end up thinking we are going to get a free lunch. The reality is there is no such thing as a free lunch, and while there are situations that are a zero-sum game, not all situations are. What we need is a way to “cut the middle” to realistically appraise each situation and realistically decide what the tradeoffs might be.

The Hedge Podcast Episode 18: Programming Fundamentals for Network Engineers

15 January 2020 | Comments Off on The Hedge Podcast Episode 18: Programming Fundamentals for Network Engineers

Network engineers do not need to become full-time coders to succeed—but some coding skills are really useful. In this episode of the Hedge, David Barrosso (you can find David’s github repositories here), Phill Simmonds, and Russ White discuss which programming skills are useful for network engineers.

Is it Money, Flexibility, or… ??

13 January 2020 | Comments Off on Is it Money, Flexibility, or… ??

Raise your hand if you think moving to platform as a service or infrastructure as a service is all about saving money. Raise it if you think moving to “the cloud” is all about increasing business agility and flexibility.

Put your hand down. You’re wrong.

Let’s be honest. For the last twenty years we network engineers have specialized in building extremely complex systems and formulating the excuses required when things don’t go right. We’ve specialized in saying “yes” to every requirement (or even wish) because we think that by saying “yes” we will become indispensable. Rather than building platforms on which the business can operate, we’ve built artisanal, complex, pets that must be handled carefully lest they turn into beasts that devour time and money. You know, like the person who tries to replicate store-bought chips by purchasing expensive fryers and potatoes, and ends up just making a mess out of the kitchen?

Learning to Trust

9 December 2019 | Comments Off on Learning to Trust

The state of automation among enterprise operators has been a matter of some interest this year, with several firms undertaking studies of the space. Juniper, for instance, recently released the first yearly edition of the SONAR report, which surveyed many network operators to set a baseline for a better future understanding of how automation is being used. Another recent report in this area is Enterprise Network Automation for 2020 and Beyond, conducted by Enterprise Management Associates.

While these reports are, themselves, interesting for understanding the state of automation in the networking world, one correlation noted on page 13 of the EMA report caught my attention: “Individuals who primarily engage with automation as users are less likely to fully trust automation.” This observation is set in parallel with two others on that same page: “Enterprises that consider network automation a high priority initiative trust automation more,” and “Individuals who fully trust automation report significant improvement in change management capacity.” It seems somewhat obvious these three are related in some way, but how? The answer to this, I think, lies in the relationship between the person and the tool.

(Effective) Habits of the Network Expert

14 October 2019 |

For any field of study, there are some mental habits that will make you an expert over time. Whether you are an infrastructure architect, a network designer, or a network reliability engineer, what are the habits of mind those involved in the building and operation of networks follow that mark out expertise?

Experts involve the user

Experts don’t just listen to the user, they involve the user. This means taking the time to teach the developer or application owner how their applications interact with the network, showing them how their applications either simplify or complicate the network, and the impact of these decisions on the overall network.

Experts think about data

Rather than applications. What does the data look like? How does the business use the data? Where does the data need to be, when does it need to be there, how often does it need to go, and what is the cost of moving it? What might be in the data that can be harmful? How can I protect the data while at rest and in flight?

Short Take: Customizing Your World

1 May 2019 | Comments Off on Short Take: Customizing Your World

Practical Simplification

22 April 2019 | Comments Off on Practical Simplification

Simplification is a constant theme not only here, and in my talks, but across the network engineering world right now. But what does this mean practically? Looking at a complex network, how do you begin simplifying? The first option is to abstract, abstract again, and abstract some more. But before diving into deep abstraction, remember…

Network Collective: The Value of Labs

17 January 2019 | Comments Off on Network Collective: The Value of Labs

The Network Collective: The Value of Labs

20 December 2018 | Comments Off on The Network Collective: The Value of Labs

Problems and Solutions

23 October 2018 | Comments Off on Problems and Solutions