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Research: Practical Challenge-Response for DNS

Because the speed of DNS is so important to the performance of any connection on the ‘net, a lot of thought goes into making DNS servers fast, including optimized software that can respond to queries in milliseconds, and connecting DNS servers to the ‘net through high bandwidth links. To set the stage for massive DDoS attacks based in the DNS system, add a third point: DNS responses tend to be much larger than DNS queries. In fact, a carefully DNS response can be many times larger than the query.

To use a DNS server as an amplifier in a DDoS attack, then, the attacker sends a query to some number of publicly accessible DNS servers. The source of this query is the address of the system to be attacked. If the DNS query is carefully crafted, the attacker can send small packets that cause a number of DNS servers to send large responses to a single IP address, causing large amounts of traffic to the system under attack.

Rami Al-Dalky, Michael Rabinovich, and Mark Allman. 2018. Practical Challenge-Response for DNS. In Proceedings of the Applied Networking Research Workshop (ANRW ’18). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 74-74. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/3232755.3232765

Carrying DNS over TCP is one way to try to resolve this problem, because TCP requires a three-way handshake. When the attacker sends a request with a spoofed source address, the server attempts to build a TCP session with the system who owns the spoofed address, which will fail. A key point: TCP three-way handshake packets are much smaller than most DNS responses, which means the attacker’s packet stream is not being amplified (in size) by the DNS server.

DNS over TCP is problematic, however. For instance, many DNS resolvers cannot reach an authoritative DNS server using TCP because of stateful packet filters, network address translators, and other processes that either modify or block TCP sessions in the network. What about DNSSEC? This does not prevent the misuse of a DNS server; it only validates the records contained in the DNS database. DNSSEC just means the attacker can send even larger really secure DNS records towards an unsuspecting system.

Another option is to create a challenge-response system much like the TCP handshake, but embed it in DNS. The most obvious place to embed such a challenge response system is in CNAME records. Assume a recursive DNS server requests a particular record; an authoritative server can respond with a CNAME record effectively telling the recursive server to ask someone else. When the recursive server sends the second query, presumably to a different server, it includes the response information it has in order to give the second server the context of its request.

To build a challenge-request system, the authoritative server sends back a CNAME telling the recursive server to contact the very same authoritative server. In order to ensure the three-way handshake is effective, the source IP address of the querying recursive DNS server is encoded into the CNAME response. When the authoritative server receives the second query, it can check the source address encoded in the second resolution request against the source of the packet containing the new query. If they do not match, the authoritative server can drop the second request; the three-way handshake failed.

If the source of the original request is spoofed, this causes the victim to receive a CNAME response telling it to ask again for the answer—which the victim will never respond to, because it did not send the original request. Since CNAME responses are small, this tactic removes the amplification the attacker is hoping for.

There is one problem with this solution, however: DNS resolvers are often pooled behind a single anycast address. Consider a resolving DNS server pool with two servers labeled A and B. Server A receives a DNS request from a host, and finding it has no cache entry for the destination, recursively sends a request to an authoritative server. The authoritative server, in turn, sends a challenge to the IP address of server A. This address, however, is an anycast address assigned to the entire pool of recursive servers. For whatever reason, the challenge—a CNAME response asking the recursive server to ask at a different location—is directed to B.

If the DNS software is set up correctly, B will respond to the request. However, this response will be sourced from B’s IP address, rather than A’s. Remember the source of the original query is encoded in the CNAME response from the responding server. Since the address encoded in the follow-on query will not match B’s address, the authoritative server will drop the request.

To solve this problem, the authors of this paper suggest a chained response. Rather than dropping the request with an improperly encoded source address, encode the new source address in the packet and send another challenge in the form of a CNAME response. Assuming there are only two servers in the pool, the next query with the encoded list of IP addresses from the CNAME response will necessarily match one of the two available source addresses, and the authoritative server can respond with the correct information.

What if the pool of recursive servers is very large—on the order of hundreds or thousands of servers? While one or two “round trips” in the form of a three-way handshake might not have too much of a performance impact, thousands could be a problem. To resolve this issue, the authors suggest taking advantage of the observation that once the packets being transmitted between the requester and the server are as large as the request itself, any amplification gain an attacker might take advantage of has been erased. Once the CNAME packet grows to the same size as a DNS request by adding source addresses observed in the three-way handshake process, the server should just answer the query. This (generally) reduces the number of round trips down to three or four before the DNS is not going to generate any more data than the attacker could send to the victim directly, and dramatically improves the performance of the scheme.

I was left with one question after reading this paper: there are carefully crafted DNS queries that can cause very large, multipacket responses. These are not mentioned at all in the paper; this seems like an area that would need to be considered and researched more deeply. Overall, however, this seems like it would be an effective system to reduce or eliminate the use of authoritative servers in DDoS reflection attacks.

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