The History of Networking: John Chapman and Cable Networks

By Russ | 27 October 2020 |

Before the large cable providers came on the scene, most people accessed the Internet through dial-up MODEMS, connecting to services like America Online, across plain old telephone lines. The entrance of cable providers, and cable MODEMs, allowed the edge of the Internet to explode, causing massive growth. Join Donald Sharp and I on this episode of the History of Networking as John Chapman discusses the origins of the cable MODEM, and the origins of the DOCSIS standards.

The Hedge Podcast #57: Brian Trammell and PANRG

By Russ | 21 October 2020 |

Brian Trammell joins Alvaro Retana and Russ White to discuss the Path Aware Research Group in the IRTF. According to the charter page, PANRG “aims to support research in bringing path awareness to transport and application layer protocols, and to bring research in this space to the attention of the Internet engineering and protocol design community.”

Hedge Podcast #56: Lysa Myers on Burnout and Good People

By Russ | 15 October 2020 | Comments Off on Hedge Podcast #56: Lysa Myers on Burnout and Good People

PTSD is a real thing in the information technology world; it impacts the ability to keep and manage good people. In this episode of the Hedge, Lya Myers joins Eyvonne Sharp, Tom Ammon, and Russ White to discuss PTSD, burnout, and strategies for dealing with them.

History of Networking: Mark Nottingham and HTTP

By Russ | 13 October 2020 | Comments Off on History of Networking: Mark Nottingham and HTTP

The HyperText Transfer Protocol (HTTP) carries the vast majority of all the traffic on the Internet today, and even the vast majority of traffic carried on private networks. How did this protocol originate, and what was the interplay between standards organizations in it’s creation, curation, and widespread deployment? Mark Nottingham joins Donald and I on this episode of the History of Networking to answer our questions.

The Hedge Podcast #55: Nick Carter and Flock Networks

By Russ | 7 October 2020 |

Nick Carter joins Tom and I to discuss Flock Networks. What is Flock Networks?

The Flock Networks IP routing suite is designed for unparalleled performance and massive scale. It has been implemented from scratch so it can excel on modern hardware. Each component of the IP routing suite is able to run in parallel, without being slowed down or interrupted by any other component.

The Hedge Podcast 54: Bob Friday and AI in Networks

By Russ | 30 September 2020 | Comments Off on The Hedge Podcast 54: Bob Friday and AI in Networks

AI in networks is a hotly contested subject—so we asked Bob Friday, CTO of Mist Systems, to explain the value and future of AI in networks. Bob joins Tom Ammon and Russ White for this episode.

History of Networking: Heather Flanagan on Identity

By Russ | 29 September 2020 | Comments Off on History of Networking: Heather Flanagan on Identity

While identity is adjacent to networking, it is an important part of the network engineering world—and is not well understood. Heather Flanagan joins Donald Sharp and Russ White to talk about SAML, unified identity, and some of the practical aspects of verifying a person’s identity.

The Hedge Podcast #53: Deprecating Interdomain ASM

By Russ | 23 September 2020 | Comments Off on The Hedge Podcast #53: Deprecating Interdomain ASM

Interdomain Any-source Multicast has proven to be an unscalable solution, and is actually blocking the deployment of other solutions. To move interdomain multicast forward, Lenny Giuliano, Tim Chown, and Toerless Eckhert wrote RFC 8815, BCP 229, recommending providers “deprecate the use of Any-Source Multicast (ASM) for interdomain multicast, leaving Source-Specific Multicast (SSM) as the recommended interdomain mode of multicast.”

The History of Comm Servers with Kevin Herbert

By Russ | 15 September 2020 | Comments Off on The History of Comm Servers with Kevin Herbert

Communication Servers designed to support hundreds or thousands of users reached their peak capabilities just as dial-up service access began to recede in importance. In fact, many network engineers today have probably never managed a dial-up communications server, which were once used to connect everything from individual users to services like AOL and remote workers to entire sites (hence OSPF’s demand circuit capability). Kevin Herbert joins us to discuss the early work on communication servers, including some of the challenges of working with early networking hardware.

The Hedge Podcast 51: Tim Fiola and pyNTM

By Russ | 9 September 2020 |

Have you ever looked at your wide area network and wondered … what would the traffic flows look like if this link or that router failed? Traffic modeling of this kind is widely available in commercial tools, which means it’s been hard to play with these kinds of tools, learn how they work, and understand how they can be effective. There is, however, an open source alternative—pyNTM. While this tool won’t replace a commercial tool, it can give you “enough to go on” for many network operators, and give you the experience and understanding needed to justify springing for a commercial product.