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Flowspec and RFC1998?

In a recent comment, Dave Raney asked:

Russ, I read your latest blog post on BGP. I have been curious about another development. Specifically is there still any work related to using BGP Flowspec in a similar fashion to RFC1998. In which a customer of a provider will be able to ask a provider to discard traffic using a flowspec rule at the provider edge. I saw that these were in development and are similar but both appear defunct. BGP Flowspec-ORF https://www.ietf.org/proceedings/93/slides/slides-93-idr-19.pdf BGP Flowspec Redirect https://tools.ietf.org/html/draft-ietf-idr-flowspec-redirect-ip-02.

This is a good question—to which there are two answers. The first is this service does exist. While its not widely publicized, a number of transit providers do, in fact, offer the ability to send them a flowspec community which will cause them to set a filter on their end of the link. This kind of service is immensely useful for countering Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks, of course. The problem is such services are expensive. The one provider I have personal experience with charges per prefix, and the cost is high enough to make it much less attractive.

Why would the cost be so high? The same reason a lot of providers do not filter for unicast Reverse Path Forwarding (uRPF) failures at scale—per packet filtering is very performance intensive, sometimes requiring recycling the packet in the ASIC. A line card normally able to support x customers without filtering may only be able to support x/2 customers with filtering. The provider has to pay for additional space, power, and configuration (the flowspec rules must be configured and maintained on the customer facing router). All of these things are costs the provider is going to pass on to their customers. The cost is high enough that I know very few people (in fact, so few as to be 0) network operators who will pay for this kind of service.

The second answer is there is another kind of service that is similar to what Dave is asking about. Many DDoS protection services offer their customers the ability to signal a request to the provider to block traffic from a particular source, or to help them manage a DDoS in some other way. This is very similar to the idea of interdomain flowspec, only using a different signaling mechanism. The signaling mechanism, in this case, is designed to allow the provider more leeway in how they respond to the request for help countering the DDoS. This system is called DDoS Open Threats Signaling; you can read more about it at this post I wrote at the ECI Telecom blog. You can also head over to the IETF DOTS WG page, and read through the drafts yourself.

Yes, I do answer reader comments… Sometimes just in email, and sometimes with a post—so comment away, ask questions, etc.

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