Enterprise and Service Provider—Once more into the Windmill

16 March 2020 | Comments Off on Enterprise and Service Provider—Once more into the Windmill

There is no enterprise, there is no service provider—there are problems, and there are solutions. I’m certain everyone reading this blog, or listening to my podcasts, or listening to a presentation I’ve given, or following along in some live training or book I’ve created, has heard me say this. I’m also certain almost everyone has heard the objections to my argument—that hyperscaler’s problems are not your problems, the technologies and solutions providers user are fundamentally different than what enterprises require.

Let me try to recap some of the arguments I’ve heard used against my assertion.

Hedge Podcast Episode 26: Jason Gooley and CHINOG

11 March 2020 | Comments Off on Hedge Podcast Episode 26: Jason Gooley and CHINOG

CHINOG is a regional network operators group that meets in Chicago once a year. For this episode of the Hedge, Jason Gooley joins us to talk about the origins of CHINOG, the challenges involved in running a small conference, some tips for those who would like to start a conference of this kind, and thoughts on the importance of community in the network engineering world.

Too Little Engineering

3 February 2020 | Comments Off on Too Little Engineering

One of my pet peeves about the network “engineering” world is this: we do too little engineering and too much administration. What brought this to mind this week is an article about Margaret Hamilton about the time she spent working on software development for the Apollo space program, and the lessons she learned about software development there. To wit—

Engineering—back in 1969 as well as here in 2020—carries a whole set of associated values with it, and one of the most important is the necessity of proofing for disaster before human usage. You don’t “fail fast” when building a bridge: You ensure the bridge works first.

Sounds simple in theory—but it is not in practice.

Let’s take, as an example, replacing some of the capacity in your data center designed on a rather traditional two-layer hierarchy, aggregation, and core.

The Hedge Podcast 13: Ivan Pepelnjak

19 November 2019 | Comments Off on The Hedge Podcast 13: Ivan Pepelnjak

In this episode of the Hedge, Tom Ammon and Russ White are joined by Ivan Pepelnjak of ipSpace.net to talk about being old, knowing about how things are going to break before they do, and being negative. Along the way, we discuss the IETF, open source, and many other aspects of the world of network engineering.

The Hedge Episode 11: Roland Dobbins on Working Remotely

6 November 2019 | Comments Off on The Hedge Episode 11: Roland Dobbins on Working Remotely

Network engineering and operations are both “mental work” that can largely be done remotely—but working remote is not only great in many ways, it is also often fraught with problems. In this episode of the Hedge, Roland Dobbins joins Tom and Russ to discuss the ins and outs of working remote, including some strategies we have found effective at removing many of the negative aspects.

(Effective) Habits of the Network Expert

14 October 2019 |

For any field of study, there are some mental habits that will make you an expert over time. Whether you are an infrastructure architect, a network designer, or a network reliability engineer, what are the habits of mind those involved in the building and operation of networks follow that mark out expertise?

Experts involve the user

Experts don’t just listen to the user, they involve the user. This means taking the time to teach the developer or application owner how their applications interact with the network, showing them how their applications either simplify or complicate the network, and the impact of these decisions on the overall network.

Experts think about data

Rather than applications. What does the data look like? How does the business use the data? Where does the data need to be, when does it need to be there, how often does it need to go, and what is the cost of moving it? What might be in the data that can be harmful? How can I protect the data while at rest and in flight?

The Hedge Episode 9: Nash King and Ethics in IT

8 October 2019 | Comments Off on The Hedge Episode 9: Nash King and Ethics in IT

Nash King (@gammacapricorni) joins Russ White and Tom Ammon in a wide ranging discussion of ethics in IT, including being comfortable with standing up and saying “no” when asked to do something you consider unethical and the virtue ethic. This is meant to be the first of a series of episodes on this topic.

Is it planning… or just plain engineering?

23 September 2019 |

Over at the ECI blog, Jonathan Homa has a nice article about the importance of network planning–

In the classic movie, The Graduate (1967), the protagonist is advised on career choices, “In one word – plastics.” If you were asked by a young person today, graduating with an engineering or similar degree about a career choice in telecommunications, would you think of responding, “network planning”? Well, probably not.

Jonathan describes why this is so–traffic is constantly increasing, and the choice of tools we have to support the traffic loads of today and tomorrow can be classified in two ways: slim and none (as I remember a weather forecaster saying when I “wore a younger man’s shoes”). The problem, however, is not just tools. The network is increasingly seen as a commodity, “pure bandwidth that should be replaceable like memory,” made up of entirely interchangeable parts and pieces, primarily driven by the cost to move a bit across a given distance.

Autonomic, Automated, and Reality

16 September 2019 |

Once the shipping department drops the box off with that new switch, router, or “firewall,” what happens next? You rack it, cable it up, turn it on, and start configuring, right? There are access to controls to configure—SSH, keys, disabling standard accounts, disabling telnet—interface addresses to configure, routing adjacencies to configure, local policies to configure, and… After configuring all of this, you can adjust routing in the network to route around the new device, and then either canary the device “in production” (if you run your network the way it should be run), or find some prearranged maintenance time to bring the new device online and test things out. After all of this, you can leave the new device up and running in the network, and move on to the next task.

Until it breaks.

Reaction: Overly Attached

10 June 2019 | Comments Off on Reaction: Overly Attached

In a recent edition of ACM Queue, Kate Matsudaira has an article discussing the problem of being overly attached to a project or solution.

The longer you work on one system or application, the deeper the attachment. For years you have been investing in it—adding new features, updating functionality, fixing bugs and corner cases, polishing, and refactoring. If the product serves a need, you likely reap satisfaction for a job well done (and maybe you even received some raises or promotions as a result of your great work).

Attachment is a two-edged sword—without some form of attachment, it seems there is no way to have pride in your work. On the other hand, attachment leads to poorly designed solutions. For instance, we all know the hyper-certified person who knows every in and out of a particular vendor’s solution, and hence solves every problem in terms of that vendor’s products. Or the person who knows a particular network automation system and, as a result, solves every problem through automation.