Modern Network Troubleshooting

I’ve reformatted and rebuilt my network troubleshooting live training for 2023, and am teaching it on the 26th of January (in three weeks). You can register at Safari Books Online. From the site:

The first way to troubleshoot faster is to not troubleshoot at all, or to build resilient networks. The first section of this class considers the nature of resilience, and how design tradeoffs result in different levels of resilience. The class then moves into a theoretical understanding of failures, how network resilience is measured, and how the Mean Time to Repair (MTTR) relates to human and machine-driven factors. One of these factors is the unintended consequences arising from abstractions, covered in the next section of the class.

The class then moves into troubleshooting proper, examining the half-split formal troubleshooting method and how it can be combined with more intuitive methods. This section also examines how network models can be used to guide the troubleshooting process. The class then covers two examples of troubleshooting reachability problems in a small network, and considers using ChaptGPT and other LLMs in the troubleshooting process. A third, more complex example is then covered in a data center fabric.

A short section on proving causation is included, and then a final example of troubleshooting problems in Internet-level systems.

Upcoming Pearson Class: Modern Network Troubleshooting

On the 26th of January, I’ll be teaching a webinar over at Safari Books Online (subscription service) called Modern Network Troubleshooting. From the blurb:

The first section of this class considers the nature of resilience, and how design tradeoffs result in different levels of resilience. The class then moves into a theoretical understanding of failures, how network resilience is measured, and how the Mean Time to Repair (MTTR) relates to human and machine-driven factors. One of these factors is the unintended consequences arising from abstractions, covered in the next section of the class.
The class then moves into troubleshooting proper, examining the half-split formal troubleshooting method and how it can be combined with more intuitive methods. This section also examines how network models can be used to guide the troubleshooting process. The class then covers two examples of troubleshooting reachability problems in a small network, and considers using ChaptGPT and other LLMs in the troubleshooting process. A third, more complex example is then covered in a data center fabric.

Register here.

Upcoming Class: How the Internet Really Works

Join me for How the Internet Really Works on the 27th! This four hour live webinar on Safari Books Online:

… de-mystifies the overall structure and “moving parts” of the global Internet. The class begins with a user connecting to a web site, and the process of translating the name of the service the user is seeking to a logical location (a server) where the service is actually located. From there, the path of the packets between the user and the server is traced, exposing each of the different kinds of providers that carry the packet along the way.

Register here.

Upcoming Training: How Routers Really Work

Have you ever wondered exactly how a router moves a packet from input to output interface? Or what the difference between is between a router’s and host’s operating system? Or why forwarding engines are built in classes, and one forwarding engine cannot “do it all?” Join me on the 22nd at 1pm ET for How Routers Really Work, a three-hour tour through router guts. I’ve replaced about 10% of the slides since the last time I taught this course.

If you register, you can watch the recording at a later date.

Register here.

Upcoming BGP Policy Course

This coming Friday I’m teaching a course in BGP policy over at Safari Books Online. It’s three hours of straight-up BGP policy goodness. From the description:

This course begins by simplifying the entire BGP policy space into three basic kinds of policies that operators implement using BGP—selecting the outbound path, selecting the inbound path, and “do not transit.” A use case is given for each of these three kinds, or classes, of policies from the perspective of a transit provider, and another from the perspective of a nontransit operator connected to the edge of the ‘net.

Please register here.

Upcoming Training: BGP Policy

On July 21st I’ll be teaching BGP Policy over at Safari Books Online. From the description:

This course begins by simplifying the entire BGP policy space into three basic kinds of policies that operators implement using BGP—selecting the outbound path, selecting the inbound path, and “do not transit.” A use case is given for each of these three kinds, or classes, of policies from the perspective of a transit provider, and another from the perspective of a nontransit operator connected to the edge of the ‘net. With this background in place, the course will then explore each of the many ways these classes of policy may be implemented using local preference, AS Path prepending, various communities, AS Path poisoning, and other techniques. Positive and negative aspects of each implementation path will be considered.

Please register here.

My courses are going through a bit of updating, but I think August and September will be How the Internet Really Works, followed by an updated course on troubleshooting. I’m incorporating more tools into the course, including (of course!) ChatGPT. Watch this space for upcoming announcements.