How to Listen to the Hedge

The Hedge is over 90 episodes now … I’m a little biased, but I believe we’re building the best content in network engineering—a good blend of soft skills, Internet policy, research, open source projects, and relevant technical content. You can always follow the Hedge here on Rule 11, of course, but it’s also available on a number of services, including—

I think it’s also available on Amazon Music, but I don’t subscribe to that service so I can’t see it. You can check the Podcast Directory for other services, as well. If you enjoy the Hedge, please post a positive rating so others can find it more easily.

Upcoming Live Webinar: Data Center Fabrics

I’ll be teaching a three-hour live webinar on data center fabrics on the 20th of August—

Data centers are the foundation of the cloud, whether private, public, on the edge, or in the center of the network. This training will focus on topologies and control planes, including scale, performance, and centralization. This training is important for network designers and operators who want to understand the elements of data center design that apply across all hardware and software types.

Register here.

How Routers Really Work Live Webinar

I’m teaching a webinar on router internals through Pearson (Safari Books Online) on the 23rd of July. From the abstract—

A network device—such as a router, switch, or firewall—is often seen as a single “thing,” an abstract appliance that is purchased, deployed, managed, and removed from service as a single unit. While network devices do connect to other devices, receiving and forwarding packets and participating in a unified control plane, they are not seen as a “system” in themselves.

Register here.

How the Internet Really Works, Part 1

I’m a bit late posting this … but this Thursday (an odd day for me) I’m running How the Internet Really Works, Part 1, over at Safari Books Online. From the page:

This live training will provide an overview of the systems, providers, and standards bodies important to the operation of the global Internet, including the Domain Name System (DNS), the routing and transport systems, standards bodies, and registrars. For DNS, the process of a query will be considered in some detail, who pays for each server used in the resolution process, and tools engineers can use to interact DNS. For routing and transport, the role of each kind of provider will be considered, along with how they make money to cover their costs, and how engineers can interact with the global routing table (the Default Free Zone, of DFZ). Finally, registrars and standards bodies will be considered, including their organizational structure, how they generate revenue, and how to find their standards.

You can register for the training at the link above. I’ll be giving part 2 of How the Internet Really Works next month.

New Video Course: How Networks Really Work

Those who follow my work know I’ve been focused on building live webinars for the last year or two, but I am still creating pre-recorded material for Pearson. The latest is built from several live webinars which I no longer give; I’ve updated the material and turned them into a seven-hour course called How Networks Really Work. Although I begin here with the “four things,” the focus is on a problem/solution view of routed control planes. From the description:

There are many elements to a networking system, including hosts, virtual hosts, routers, virtual routers, routing protocols, discovery protocols, etc. Each protocol and device (whether virtual or physical) is generally studied as an individual “thing.” It is not common to consider all these parts as components of a system that works together to carry traffic through a network. To show how all these components work together to form a complete system, this video course presents a series of walk throughs showing the processing involved in various kinds of network events, and how control planes use those events to build the information needed to carry traffic through a network.

You can find this How Networks Really Work here.

This course is largely complimentary to the course Ethan and I did a couple of years back, Understanding Network Transports. Taking both would give you a good understanding of network fundamentals. This material is also parallel and complimentary to Problems and Solutions in Computer Networks, which Ethan and I published a few years ago.

I am working on one new live webinar; I really need to get my butt in gear on another one I’ve been discussing for a long time (but I somehow dropped the ball).

Master Class: Security in the Design of DC Fabrics

I’m teaching another master class over at Juniper on February the 10th at 12 noon PT (3PM ET):

It’s typical to think about scale, speed, oversubscription, and costs when designing a data center fabric. But what about security in a world increasingly focused on privacy, data protection, and preventing downtime caused by cyber breaches? This session will consider how data center fabric software and control plane components can impact security, including the ability to effectively manage segmentation policy, controlling failure domains, and the impact host-based routing has on fabric security.

You can register here.