Interop is the longest running “show” in the networking space—but it didn’t not start as a “show” at all. Dan Lynch, the founder of Interop, joins us at the History of Networking to talk about how Interop really started (hint, it’s in the name). One important lesson to learn through this discussion: it is not enough to have standards or open source; in the realm of network protocols, being able to prove multiple vendors can work together is important, too.

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MultiPath TCP (MPTCP) is an effort towards enabling the simultaneous use of several IP-addresses/interfaces by a modification of TCP that presents a regular TCP interface to applications, while in fact spreading data across several subflows. Benefits of this include better resource utilization, better throughput and smoother reaction to failures.

You can learn more about M-TCP here and here.

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JJ Garcia is Distinguished Professor of Computer Science and Engineering and Jack Baskin Endowed Chair of Computer Engineering at USC Santa Cruz. He first became involved in packet networks in the 1980’s, eventually inventing the Diffusing Update Algorithm (DUAL), which later became the basis for the Enhanced Interior Gateway Protocol (EIGRP). You can find more information about Dr. Garcia at his personal page.

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The first book mentioned in this podcast is Computer and Communication Networks by Nader F. Mir.

The second book mentioned in this podcast is Flows in Networks by L. R. Ford Jr. and D. R. Fulkerson.

You can find the entire history of networking series here.


Many different kinds of backplanes have been used to connect line cards and other components in network devices like routers, switches, and firewalls. The original custom-designed busses gave way to plain Ethernet busses, then to crossbars and Clos fabrics. Along the way more exotic designs, such as virtual meshes on top of toroids have been used, as well. Join Ken Duda, Russ White, and Donald Sharp as we discuss the many different kinds of backplanes and the history of their development.

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Larry Landweber is John P. Morgridge Professor Emeritus of Computer Science at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. He founded the CSNET project in 1979, one of the earliest networks eventually contributing to the creation of the Internet as it exists today. The CSNET eventually became National Science Foundation Network (NSFNET). Larry is credited with making the decision to use TCP/IP on CSNET.

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