Hedge Podcast Episode 26: Jason Gooley and CHINOG

11 March 2020 | Comments Off on Hedge Podcast Episode 26: Jason Gooley and CHINOG

CHINOG is a regional network operators group that meets in Chicago once a year. For this episode of the Hedge, Jason Gooley joins us to talk about the origins of CHINOG, the challenges involved in running a small conference, some tips for those who would like to start a conference of this kind, and thoughts on the importance of community in the network engineering world.

The Art and Necessity of Refocusing

9 March 2020 | Comments Off on The Art and Necessity of Refocusing

Staring at the white line is fun at first, then mesmerizing, then it is frightening… then finally it is just plain dull. But let’s talk about the terrifying bit because it’s the scary stage that makes us all reject change out of fear for the future. And, trust me, a kid sitting in a car with no doors staring down at the white line while his uncle drives 60 miles-per-hour is going to be frightened from time to time.

The Hedge Podcast Episode 25: Building the Next Generation of Network Engineer

3 March 2020 | Comments Off on The Hedge Podcast Episode 25: Building the Next Generation of Network Engineer

If there is one thing I notice when I look around at the IETF—and many other places where I meet a lot of network operations and engineering folk—it’s that we all seem to be getting a bit older. This should lead us to an obvious question—what are we doing about bringing up a new generation of network engineers? David Huberman joins Tom Ammon and I to discuss this interesting question. David i s involved in a number of community-based efforts to train next generation network engineers, some of which he discusses in his excellent article at the APNIC blog.

Ironies of Automation

24 February 2020 | Comments Off on Ironies of Automation

This is the first of the ironies of automation Lisanne Bainbridge discusses—and this is the irony I’d like to explore. The irony she is articulating is this: the less you work on a system, the less likely you are to be able to control that system efficiently. Once a system is automated, however, you will not work on the system on a regular basis, but you will be required to take control of the system when the automated controller fails in some way. Ironically, in situations where the automated controller fails, the amount of control required to make things right again will be greater than in normal operation.

In the case of machine operation, it turns out that the human operator is required to control the machine in just the situations where the least amount of experience is available. This is analogous to the automated warehouse in which automated systems are used to stack and sort material. When the automated systems break down, there is absolutely no way for the humans involved to figure out why things are stacked the way they are, nor how to sort things out to get things running again.

The Hedge Podcast Episode 17: Michael Natkin and Strong Opinions Loosely Held

8 January 2020 | Comments Off on The Hedge Podcast Episode 17: Michael Natkin and Strong Opinions Loosely Held

According to Michael Natkin, “in the tech industry, with our motto of “strong opinions, loosely held” (also known as “strong opinions, weakly held”), we’ve glorified overconfidence.” Michael joins Tom Ammon and Russ White to discuss the culture of overconfidence, and how it impacts the field of information technology.

The Hedge Episode 11: Roland Dobbins on Working Remotely

6 November 2019 | Comments Off on The Hedge Episode 11: Roland Dobbins on Working Remotely

Network engineering and operations are both “mental work” that can largely be done remotely—but working remote is not only great in many ways, it is also often fraught with problems. In this episode of the Hedge, Roland Dobbins joins Tom and Russ to discuss the ins and outs of working remote, including some strategies we have found effective at removing many of the negative aspects.

Data, applications, and the meaning of the network

28 October 2019 |

Two things which seem to be universally true in the network engineering space right this moment. The first is that network engineers are convinced their jobs will not exist or there will only be network engineers “in the cloud” within the next five years. The second is a mad scramble to figure out how to add value to the business through the network. These two movements are, of course, mutually exclusive visions of the future. If there is absolutely no way to add value to a business through the network, then it only makes sense to outsource the whole mess to a utility-level provider.

The result, far too often, is for the folks working on the network to run around like they’ve been in the hot aisle so long that your hair is on fire. This result, however, somehow seems less than ideal.

(Effective) Habits of the Network Expert

14 October 2019 |

For any field of study, there are some mental habits that will make you an expert over time. Whether you are an infrastructure architect, a network designer, or a network reliability engineer, what are the habits of mind those involved in the building and operation of networks follow that mark out expertise?

Experts involve the user

Experts don’t just listen to the user, they involve the user. This means taking the time to teach the developer or application owner how their applications interact with the network, showing them how their applications either simplify or complicate the network, and the impact of these decisions on the overall network.

Experts think about data

Rather than applications. What does the data look like? How does the business use the data? Where does the data need to be, when does it need to be there, how often does it need to go, and what is the cost of moving it? What might be in the data that can be harmful? How can I protect the data while at rest and in flight?

The Hedge Episode 9: Nash King and Ethics in IT

8 October 2019 | Comments Off on The Hedge Episode 9: Nash King and Ethics in IT

Nash King (@gammacapricorni) joins Russ White and Tom Ammon in a wide ranging discussion of ethics in IT, including being comfortable with standing up and saying “no” when asked to do something you consider unethical and the virtue ethic. This is meant to be the first of a series of episodes on this topic.

Is it planning… or just plain engineering?

23 September 2019 |

Over at the ECI blog, Jonathan Homa has a nice article about the importance of network planning–

In the classic movie, The Graduate (1967), the protagonist is advised on career choices, “In one word – plastics.” If you were asked by a young person today, graduating with an engineering or similar degree about a career choice in telecommunications, would you think of responding, “network planning”? Well, probably not.

Jonathan describes why this is so–traffic is constantly increasing, and the choice of tools we have to support the traffic loads of today and tomorrow can be classified in two ways: slim and none (as I remember a weather forecaster saying when I “wore a younger man’s shoes”). The problem, however, is not just tools. The network is increasingly seen as a commodity, “pure bandwidth that should be replaceable like memory,” made up of entirely interchangeable parts and pieces, primarily driven by the cost to move a bit across a given distance.